The Importance of Research

Posted by Zera Day in blogs - (Comments Off)

writing-hand-silhouetteThe importance of proper research cannot be understated. Methodology and samples must be maintained consistently for research and science of all kinds to progress. It is not only there to prove the truth, but also in fact make sure we know what is not true. Leann Zarah has more to say on the matter.

UCT Famelab!

Posted by Zera Day in event - (Comments Off)

FameLab poster-1UCT Students one and all, who are interested in Astronomy and Science in general should check out UCT’s Fame Lab event! UCT has a slew of young scientists compete and present a topic in just three minutes~

29 August 2017
Venue: Sport Science Institute, Newlands
• 16h30-17h00 Welcome drinks
• 17h00-17h15 Welcome
• 17h15-18h15 Finalists present
• 18h15-18h35 Invited Speaker: Prof. Thomas Jarrett Topic: Visualizing Big Data Science
• 18h40-18h50 Winner announced
•18h50 Closing by Prof Phakeng (DVC of Research & Internationalisation)
• 19h00 Cocktail dinner

Please RSVP to Judith.Rix@uct.ac.za by 21 August as space is limited and for catering purposes.

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A heartfelt congratulations to UCT Libraries’ very own Jayarani Raju on the publication of her research! More information below the cut.

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Even Google can lead you astray

Posted by Zera Day in resources | tools - (Comments Off)

When perusing for papers, scouring for sources or finding features to add to your latest bit of cutting edge research it’s important to remind yourself just how fallible our most trusted finding tools can be. Even Google, especially with it’s ‘featured answers’ feature, can lead you astray. It’s incredibly important to check your sources and make sure they are backed up themselves by research and peer review. Vox has more to say on the matter here:

What is eResearch?

Posted by Zera Day in blogs | resources - (Comments Off)

To many researchers out there research is a set of methodologies that you apply when gathering and interpreting data out in the physical world. But in the busy modern world with so much data available online, with connections to many millions of people on earth, there are other options for research too. Chido Mbambe has more to say on the subject here.

 

BookshelfGrowing the Next Generation of Researchers: A Handbook for Emerging Researchers and Their Mentors
Lyn Holness

This book arises out of the work of the Emerging Researcher Programme at UCT and follows on an earlier publication. Designed as a tool for emerging researchers and their mentors, it provides strategies for research growth in areas such as understanding the relationship between teaching and research; obtaining higher degrees; producing peer-reviewed research output; generating and managing research funding; effective research planning; engaging in interdisciplinary research; and postgraduate supervision.

“When you look into an abyss, the abyss also looks into you.”

Friedrich Nietzsche

Crumpled papers.

Photo by ds139. Used under CC2.0.

As I am writing this, I find myself struggling with writers block, and I discover Nietzsche’s famous words echoing through my mind, though slightly construed. As we stare onto the blank, the blank also stares back onto us, and so it goes, the terrible cycle of empty page and empty mind feeding one other. The question at hand: is writer’s block real, and if so, where does it come from? The notion that there is a psychological aspect associated with writer’s block seems to be wide reaching and yet altogether misguided.

Robert Boice notes in his essay on writing blocks that references to this problem have been strewn, and that they have often been based on a writer’s subjective experiences. Psychologists have little to say on the subject and yet the fact that the term is often used interchangeably with writer’s anxiety brings it again, though somewhat problematically, into the realm of psychology.

Is this so called block a manifestation of our own insecurities and inexperience as writers? This would seem to be plausible. During the write up of my own research, I often felt overwhelmed and unequal to the task at hand. However, there is hope for us yet. Keith Hjortshoj writes in his book Understanding Writers Block, “Young inexperienced writers rarely encounter serious blocks… writing blocks are most common among advanced undergraduates, graduate students, scholars, and other professional writers who are not supposed to need help” (2001: 3). (more…)